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STATE HEALTH PLAN PREVENTION PARTNERS HAPPENINGS FOR
JUNE 2009
EMPLOYEE INSURANCE PROGRAM
MONDAY TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
National
Firework Safety
Home Safety
Scleroderma
Awareness Month
National Cancer
The State Health
Your Kidney’s
Survivors Day
Plan Preventive
For Life: Taking
Worksite Regional
Screening
Columbia, SC
Greenville, SC
14 15 16 17 18
21 22 23 24 25

What is patellofemoral pain?

Patellofemoral pain is a common knee problem. If you have this condition, you feel pain under
and around your kneecap. The pain can get worse when you're active or when you sit for a long
time. You can have the pain in one or both knees. The exact cause of patellofemoral pain isn't
known. It probably has to do with the way your kneecap (patella) moves on the groove of your
thigh bone (femur).
Self-Care Guidelines

Take a break from physical activity that causes a lot of pounding on your legs, such
as running, volleyball or basketball. If you want to keep exercising, try swimming or another low-impact activity. You may want to try working out on nonimpact elliptical trainers, which are popular at gyms. Because these machines support your body weight, they put less stress on your knees. As your knees feel better, you can go back to your normal sports. But do this slowly, increasing the amount of time you do the sports activity a little at a time.
Talk to your doctor about footwear. It may help to bring your shoes in for the doctor
to see. Proper walking or running shoes can help knee pain. Even a simple arch support insert from a shoe store can be helpful. This insert is less expensive than a custom-made support or brace. An orthopedist or podiatrist may assist in helping you find properly fitted athletic shoes. • Ice your knees for 10 to 20 minutes after activity. This can ease the pain and speed
up healing. To keep your hands free, use an elastic wrap to hold the ice pack in place. A medicine such as ibuprofen (one brand name: Motrin) may also help relieve your pain, but talk to your doctor before you take this medicine. If the pain does not stop after 3 or 4 weeks, call your doctor. Your doctor my prescribe physical therapy or refer you to a specialist that deals with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Source: Family Doctor SOUTH CAROLINA BUDGET AND CONTROL BOARD
EMPLOYEE INSURANCE PROGRAM
THE STATE HEALTH PLAN PREVENTION PARTNERS
MAY 2009

Type 2 Diabetes: Skin Complications

Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including the skin. People with diabetes are at a
greater risk of developing a skin disorder during their life. In fact, skin problems are sometimes
the first sign that a person has diabetes. Luckily, most skin conditions can be prevented or easily
treated if caught early. Bacterial infections, fungal infections, itching, diabetic dermopathy,
necrobiosis, diabetic blisters and eruptive xanthomatosis are some skin infections that may affect
people with diabetes.
Bacterial Infections

Several kinds of bacterial infections occur in people with diabetes. Common bacterial infections
are styes and boils. Styes are infections of the glands of the eyelid. Boils or skin abscess is a
localized infection deep in the skin. A boil generally starts as a reddened, tender area. Over time,
the area becomes firm, hard and tender. Eventually, the center of the abscess softens and
becomes filled with infection-fighting white blood cells that the body sends from the
bloodstream to eradicate the infection. Several different organisms can cause infections. The
most common ones are the Staphylococcus bacteria, also called staph.
Fungal Infections

The culprit in fungal infections of people with diabetes is often Candida albicans. This yeast-like
fungus can create itchy rashes of moist, red areas surrounded by tiny blisters and scales. These
infections often occur in warm, moist folds of the skin. Problem areas are under the breasts,
around the nails, between fingers and toes, in the corners of the mouth, under the foreskin (in
uncircumcised men), and in the armpits and groin. Common fungal infections include jock itch,
athlete's foot, ringworm (a ring-shaped itchy patch), and vaginal infection that causes itching.
Acanthosis Nigricans
Acanthosis nigricans is a condition in which tan or brown raised areas appear on the sides of the
neck, armpits, and groin. Sometimes they also occur on the hands, elbows, and knees. Acanthosis
nigricans usually strikes people who are very overweight. The best treatment is to lose weight.
Some creams can help the spots look better but weight management is the ideal solution.
Self-Care Practice

People with diabetes should practice good skin care, follow their doctor’s care guidelines and
inform their doctor of any changes that may occur with their skin. Most skin conditions can be
prevented or easily treated if caught early.
Source: American Diabetes Association
SOUTH CAROLINA BUDGET AND CONTROL BOARD
EMPLOYEE INSURANCE PROGRAM
THE STATE HEALTH PLAN PREVENTION PARTNERS
MAY 2009


Warts are growth of the skin and mucous membranes that are caused by over 100 types of the
human papillomovirus (HPV). The virus causes thickening of the top skin layer. A plantar wart
occurs on the sole of the foot and can look like a callus. Warts are usually acquired from person-
to-person contact. The virus is not highly contagious but can cause an infection by entering
through a small break in the skin. Plantar warts are usually tender.
Signs and Symptoms

The most common locations for plantar warts include:
• Soles of the feet, especialy the weight bearing areas (eg, the heels and ball of the feet) • Undersides of the toes
Plantar warts may occur singly or in clusters. They appear as thick, rough, callus-like thickening
on the soles of the feet. In addition, plantar warts often have multiple small black “dots” at the
surface, which are actually tiney blood vessels.
Treatments Your Physician May Prescribe

Because warts can resolve on their own, it is not necessary to treat all warts. Additionally,
treating warts may not always destroy them, nor will it necessarily keep other warts from
appearing. Treatment can be painful and cause scars and might need to be repeated, so it should
only be done in cases where the warts are highly bothersome or interfere with daily life.
Once you have been diagnosed with a plantar wart, your physician may try several treatments:
• Using a laser to disrupt the blood supply of the warts • Application of cantharidin, podophyllin, tretinoin or salicylic acid • Injection with Candida antigen, an allergy-causing protein, or with bleomycin Plantar warts can be very stubborn and effective treatment may take many months. SOUTH CAROLINA BUDGET AND CONTROL BOARD
EMPLOYEE INSURANCE PROGRAM
THE STATE HEALTH PLAN PREVENTION PARTNERS
MAY 2009

State Health Plan Prevention Partners
Employee Insurance Program
The mission of The State Health Plan Prevention Partners is to provide activities, programs and services that encourage health promotion, disease prevention and early detection of disease in South Carolina's state agencies, public schools and local subdivisions. Program Goal
The goals of The State Health Plan Prevention Partners are to increase the knowledge of state employees about health promotion and education topics, to increase the number of state employees who practice healthy lifestyle behaviors and to encourage the practice of early detection of disease. These goals are accomplished through program objectives in the areas of health promotion, disease prevention, early detection of disease and demand management. National Health Observances – June is…

National Scleroderma Awareness Month.
United Scleroderma Foundation, Inc., 12 Kent
Way, Suite 101, Byfield, MA 01922. Telephone: (800) 722-HOPE. Web site: www.scleroderma.org
Fireworks Safety Month.
Prevent Blindness America, 211 West Wacker Drive, Suite
1700 Chicago, IL 60606. Telephone: (800) 331-2020. Web site: www.preventblindness.org
Home Safety Month. Home Safety Council, 1250 Eye Street NW, Suite 1000,
Washington, DC, 20005. Telephone: (202) 330-4900. Web site: www.homsafetycouncil.org
The State Health Plan Preventive Worksite Regional Screening.
June 10, 2009 in
Greenville, SC. Contact Elliott McElveen at (803) 737-0112 or via email emcelveen@eip.sc.gov. Website: www.eip.sc.gov
Your Kidney’s For Life: Taking Control. June 11, 2009 in Columbia, SC. Contact
Ramsey Makhuli at 803-737-3823 or at RMakhuli@eip.sc.gov . Website: www.eip.sc.gov Promoting Physical Activity Through Trails

Trails have been built and maintained in this country mainly for reasons related to transportation
and recreation. Rarely, however, have people asked how important are trails to our health and
whether trails should be a resource accessible to multiple-types of recreation users?
There is strong scientific evidence that regular physical activity promotes health and reduces risk
of premature death and many chronic diseases. It is recommended that adults obtain a minimum
of 30 minutes of moderate intensity (e.g., brisk walking) on most, if not all, days of the week.
The health benefits of using trails are significant

• Regular physical activity is a key component of any weight loss effort. Using trails can directly impact our nation's obesity epidemic by encouraging people to become more
physically active while exploring the great outdoors.
• Participating in aerobic training significantly reduces systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Trails provide the opportunity for individuals to help control their hypertension
(high blood pressure).
• Moderate physical activity such as walking and cycling on trails can protect against developing non-insulin dependent diabetes.
• Through aerobic exercise training, walking and cycling on trails can improve symptoms of mild-to-moderate depression and anxiety of a magnitude comparable to that
obtained with a pharmacological agent.
• Studies have reported that walking two or more miles a day reduces the chance of premature death by 50%.

Information to locate walking trails:

1. To learn more about South Carolina trails visit www.sctrails.net/trails/ 2. To learn more about national trails visit the American Hiking Society at www.americanhiking.org/infocenter/index.html SOUTH CAROLINA BUDGET AND CONTROL BOARD
EMPLOYEE INSURANCE PROGRAM
THE STATE HEALTH PLAN PREVENTION PARTNERS
JUNE 2009

Insulin Resistance and Pre-Diabetes

Insulin resistance is a silent condition that increases the chances of developing diabetes and heart
disease. Learning about insulin resistance is the first step you can take toward making lifestyle
changes that will help you prevent diabetes and other health problems.
What does insulin do?

After you eat, the food is broken down into glucose, the simple sugar that is the main source of
energy for the body’s cells. But your cells cannot use glucose without insulin, a hormone
produced by the pancreas. Insulin helps the cells take in glucose and convert it to energy. When
the pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body is unable to use the insulin that is present,
the cells cannot use glucose. Excess glucose builds up in the blood stream, setting the stage for
diabetes. Being obese or overweight affects the way insulin works in your body. Extra fat tissue
can make your body resistant to the action of insulin, but exercise helps insulin work well.
What are the symptoms of insulin resistance and pre-diabetes?

Insulin resistance and pre-diabetes usually have no symptoms. You may have one or both
conditions for several years without noticing anything. If you have a severe form of insulin
resistance, you may get dark patches of skin, usually on the back of your neck. Sometimes
people get a dark ring around their neck. Other possible sites for these patches include elbows,
knees, knuckles and armpit. This condition is called acanthosis nigricans.
If you have a mild or moderate form of insulin resistance, blood test may show normal or high
blood glucose and high levels of insulin at the same time.
Can you reverse insulin resistance?
Yes, you can reverse insulin resistance with physical activity and weight loss. By losing weight
and being more physically active, you may avoid developing type 2 diabetes. In 2001, the
National Institutes of Health completed the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), which found
that lifestyle changes reduced the risk of diabetes by 58 percent. Also, many people with pre-
diabetes returned to normal blood glucose levels.
To access chronic disease seminars visit Prevention Partners’ webpage and click on “Training Calendar”. The Training Calendar allows you to register for any of the health seminars listed. The online training application allows participants to register quickly and is environmentally responsible by saving paper. Currently, there are over ten (10) seminars that employees can register for online. Below are steps to help you to access Prevention Partners’ webpage: 1. Log onto www.eip.sc.gov and click on Prevention Partners 2. After selecting Prevention Partners select “Training Calendar”. You can register for any classes that are listed on the calendar. SOUTH CAROLINA BUDGET AND CONTROL BOARD
EMPLOYEE INSURANCE PROGRAM
THE STATE HEALTH PLAN PREVENTION PARTNERS
JUNE 2009

STATE HEALTH PLAN PREVENTION PARTNERS HAPPENINGS FOR
JULY 2009
EMPLOYEE INSURANCE PROGRAM
MONDAY TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
Hemochromatosis National Group B
UV Safety Month
Awareness Month
Strep Awareness
National Youth
Sports Week
12 13 14 15
The State Health
Plan Preventive
Worksite Regional
Screening
Florence, SC
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
Tobacco Cessation
Information
Berkeley County
2 Sessions
26 27 28 29 30 31 Tobacco
Cessation
Information
Greenwood, SC
July 16, 2009
State Health Plan Prevention Partners
Employee Insurance Program
The mission of The State Health Plan Prevention Partners is to provide activities, programs and services that encourage health promotion, disease prevention and early detection of disease in South Carolina's state agencies, public schools and local subdivisions. Program Goal
The goals of The State Health Plan Prevention Partners are to increase the knowledge of state employees about health promotion and education topics, to increase the number of state employees who practice healthy lifestyle behaviors and to encourage the practice of early detection of disease. These goals are accomplished through program objectives in the areas of health promotion, disease prevention, early detection of disease and demand management. National Health Observances – July is…

Hemochromatosis Awareness Month.
Iron Disorder Institute, 2722 Wade Hampton
Blvd., Suite A, Greenville, SC 29615. Phone: (888) 565-4766. Web site: www.irondisorders.org
National Group B Strep Awareness Month.
The Jesse Cause – Saving the Babies from
Group B Strep, 567 West Channel Islands Boulevard, #235, Port Hueneme, CA 93041. Phone: (805)815-2944. Web site: www.thejessecause.org
UV Safety Month.
American Academy of Opthalmology, P.O. Box 7424, San Francisco,
CA 94120-7424. Phone: (415) 447-0213. Web site: www.aao.org
National Youth Sports Week. National Recreation and Park Association. 22377
Belmont Ridge Road, Ashburn, VA, 20148-4150. Phone: (703) 858-0784.
The State Health Plan Preventive Worksite Regional Screening. July 16, 2009 in
Florence, SC at Francis Marion University. Contact Elliott McElveen at (803) 737-0112 or via email emcelveen@eip.sc.gov. To access the Regional Screening registration form visit www.eip.sc.gov , click on Prevention Partners. The registration form is located in the “What’s New” section.
Tobacco Cessation Information Seminar. July 16, 2009 in Greenwood, SC at Piedmont
Technical College. Online registration is available on the Training Calendar. Send inquiries to xhopkins@eip.sc.gov
Tobacco Cessation Information Seminar. July 22, 2009 in Moncks Corner, SC at
Berkeley County Water and Sanitation. Two sessions are available. Online registration is available on the Training Calendar. Send inquiries to xhopkins@eip.sc.gov

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